Find a board certified veterinary dentist specializing in advanced animal dental care and oral surgery for your dogs and cats.

Pet dentists offer a wide range of veterinary dentistry services including comprehensive dog and cat teeth cleanings, fractured pet tooth repair, treatment for pet periodontal disease and oral surgery for all pet dental injuries and disease.

Pet dental health is vital in the long term overall health of your pets and it’s important to choose an experienced dog or cat dentist who can provide the highest level of care for your four legged family members. When choosing an AVDC vet dental specialist, you can be assured your dog or cat will receive a complete exam, including advanced anesthesia technology and vet dental x-rays that assure a comprehensive picture of your pet's dental health and any issues that may be causing them pain. If your pet needs a dental exam or you are concerned about a potential problem in your dog or cat's mouth, locate a vet dental specialist in your area and contact them to learn more about their veterinary dentistry services.

Treating Labrador Retriever’s Oral Tumor

Note the obvious swelling of the right maxilla. The owner reported rapid growth of the mass, debulked 2 months prior.

Note the obvious swelling of the right
maxilla. The owner reported rapid growth of the mass, debulked two months prior.

“Mr. Gibbs” is a 12 year old Labrador Retriever who came to Gulf South Veterinary Dentistry & Oral Surgery to have a tumor removed from his mouth.

The large tumor had grown back quickly after his regular veterinarian biopsied it a couple of months earlier. We knew it was a tumor called a plasmacytoma, which is generally not metastatic (does not spread to other parts of the body), but can be locally invasive. The mass was irritating the dog and the owners so we removed it, along with several teeth and part of the upper jaw, or maxilla.

While we were unable to remove the deepest parts of the tumor that had grown into the bones of his nose, “Mr. Gibbs” is much happier and more comfortable than he was before the surgery. He is now seeing a veterinary oncologist (cancer specialist) for follow up treatment of a more serious mass on his skin that we removed at the same time as the jaw surgery.

tumor in dog's mouth

A photo of the tumor in “Mr. Gibbs” mouth.

The incision site at the two week recheck. Everything looks great!

The incision site at the two week recheck. Everything looks great!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is no sign that either cancer has spread and “Gibbs” continues to do great at home.

“Mr. Gibbs” and his owner were both very happy at the 2 week recheck. One can hardly tell he had a large piece of his upper jaw removed!

“Mr. Gibbs” and his owner were both very happy at the 2 week recheck. One can hardly tell he had a large piece of his upper jaw removed!

If at any point you notice a growth or tumor in your dog or cat’s mouth, or unusual swelling on their face, it’s extremely important to have it immediately evaluated by a veterinary dentist who can determine whether the tumor is benign or malignant and then provide the best possible treatment plan.