Find Board Certified Veterinary Dentists

Board certified veterinary dentists specialize in advanced animal dental care and oral surgery for your dogs and cats.

These nationally known pet dentists offer a wide range of veterinary dentistry services including comprehensive dog and cat teeth cleanings, fractured pet tooth repair, treatment for pet periodontal disease and oral surgery for all pet dental injuries and disease.

Pet dental health is vital in the long term overall health of your pets and it’s important to choose an experienced dog or cat dentist who can provide the highest level of care for your four legged family members. When choosing an AVDC vet dental specialist, you can be assured your dog or cat will receive a complete exam, including advanced anesthesia technology and vet dental x-rays that assure a comprehensive picture of your pet's dental health and any issues that may be causing them pain. If your pet needs a dental exam or you are concerned about a potential problem in your dog or cat's mouth, locate a vet dental specialist in your area and contact them to learn more about their veterinary dentistry services.

New Year Pet Dental Health Resolutions

Dog Cat Pet Dental HealthIt’s that time of year again, why not set some resolutions that will benefit your furry family members? Your pet’s dental health is nothing to ignore and plays a significant role in their overall health and wellness. So, let us help you make some positive resolutions that will keep your pet’s smile healthy and ultimately save you money in the cost of treating preventable dental disease.

1. Make your pet’s annual veterinary dental cleaning appointment

Periodontal disease is the number one health condition in pets, but with proper care and veterinary cleanings, it’s entirely preventable. A comprehensive veterinary dental cleaning under anesthesia allows for a thorough exam, scaling and polishing of your pet’s teeth along with the opportunity to identify and treat early stages of periodontal disease.

It is also vital to understand that an “anesthesia-free pet teeth cleaning” is NOT a cleaning nor does it provide any benefit to your pet’s dental health. These services often offered by groomers or pet stores only serve to give a pet owner a false sense of confidence that their pet’s teeth are clean, while periodontal disease lurks and continues to do damage beneath the gumline. See a case demonstrating the consequences of anesthesia free dentals.

2. Confirm your veterinarian uses vet dental radiographs as part of the cleaning.

A veterinary dental cleaning should always include radiographs. Veterinary dental radiographs are the only way to get a complete picture of a pet’s mouth, most importantly what’s going on beneath the gumline. Even the most expert eye is unable to identify dental disease beneath the gumline. So, when you make your pet’s veterinary dental cleaning appointment, ask your veterinarian if their protocol includes radiographs of your pet’s mouth.

3. Start brushing your pet’s teeth daily at home.

Imagine not brushing your teeth every day, then imagine if you didn’t brush your teeth for months… Your pet has the same bacteria in their mouth as you, and left without any brushing just leaves that bacteria in their mouth to sit and develop into periodontal disease. Daily brushing of your pets teeth is the best step you can take to keep periodontal disease at bay in between their annual veterinary dental cleaning. Watch the video below for a guide to brushing your pet’s teeth.

4. Start the habit of looking in your pet’s mouth weekly for signs of anything abnormal.

You are an excellent person to help identify any problems in your pet’s mouth. A weekly visual check of your pet’s teeth, gums and oral cavity offers the opportunity to catch any signs of problems such as chipped or broken teeth, tumors or anything unusual. Our pet’s can’t tell us when they are in pain, so you can be your pet’s advocate in noticing signs of problems early, before they cause further pain and problems.

5. Don’t give bones, antlers or other hard items to your pet to chew on.

Pet broken teeth are painful for your pet and treatment can require root canal or extraction. One very simple way to prevent pet broken teeth is not providing your pet chew items that are likely to cause damage. Bones, antlers, nylon toys or other hard materials are hard and will chip and break a pet’s teeth. The best rule of thumb is if you can’t bend it or it has no give when pushing your fingernail into it, it’s too hard. Need proof, see a case involving damage from antlers given as chew toys.