Hoping to Save Dog’s Incisor Teeth After Anesthesia Free Dental Care

Dog with periodontal disease

Dog with periodontal diseaseBrioso had been getting anesthesia free dentistry performed for the last few years. Upon a regular veterinary visit, the doctor examined his mouth and teeth, which looked good externally. However, the vet then performed an Orastrip test to help identify periodontal disease.

OraStrip canine periodontal disease test strip

The test results were positive for periodontal disease and the patient was placed under anesthesia for an exam and dental radiographs (x-rays). Unfortunately, numerous severely diseased teeth were found, including the dog’s lower incisors which were very loose.

Brioso was referred to Dr. Niemiec of Southern California Veterinary Specialties to try and save his incisors, as extraction of a dog’s incisors not optimal and when possible, veterinary dentists will make every effort to preserve these teeth.

In order to save the teeth, a periodontal flap was performed to clean the infected root surfaces, followed by bone grafting and a barrier to attempt to regrow the lost bone. In addition, because of the loose teeth, a periodontal splint was placed to help the area heal.

Cases like this are becoming more common as more pet owners are choosing to skip proper veterinary dental care, for anesthesia free dental cleanings. Like other cases, Brioso’s demonstrates the ineffectiveness of anesthesia free pet teeth cleanings and the potential damage and more extensive treatment costs in the long term. While it is good news we have the technology to save pet teeth when possible, veterinary dental professionals would prefer a pet receive proper pet dental cleanings which can prevent pet dental disease from becoming so severe.

Below are images of Brioso’s case, however it will take up to six months to determine if the bone grafting worked and his teeth saved.

 

 

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