Yes, Pets Do Get Periodontal Disease

It may come as a surprise, but periodontal disease is the most common clinical condition in adult dogs and cats. Periodontal disease occurs when bacteria from the dog or cat’s mouth form on the teeth in a plaque. The plaque makes its way under the gumline and sets in motion a vicious cycle, which, if left undetected and untreated can eventually lead to tooth loss.

Dog jaw fracture due to periodontal disease

X-ray showing jaw fracture due to advanced periodontal disease.

The process is described by California Veterinary Dentist, Dr. Brook Niemiec, DAVDC. “The bacteria in the plaque beneath the gum line will secrete toxins. These toxins damage the periodontal tissues and can decrease the attachment. However, the bacteria will also elicit an inflammatory response from the animal’s gingival tissues. White blood cells and other inflammatory mediators will leak out of the periodontal tissues and into the periodontal space (between the gum or bone and the tooth). The white blood cells will release their enzymes to destroy the bacterial invaders, but will also damage the attachment of the tooth. As the disease progresses, the pocket will get deeper and deeper. This will weaken the bone in the area, and if it is in the lower jaw it can weaken it to the point of causing a  fracture. The end stage of this disease is tooth loss, however the disease has caused pain and problems for your pet well before this.” Continue reading “Yes, Pets Do Get Periodontal Disease” »

Treating Tripper’s Chronic Oral Disease

Treating Cat Oral Disease - Houston Vet DentistTripper the cat was initially referred to Dr. Boyd at Veterinary Dental Services & Oral Surgery in Houston, for full mouth extractions to treat chronic periodontal disease, feline tooth resorption, gingival hyperplasia and oral pain.

Tripper’s family brought him to Veterinary Dental Services & Oral Surgery to have him evaluated and treated to save some of his teeth if possible. Dr. Boyd gave Tripper a thorough oral and dental evaluation under anesthesia that included full mouth vet dental x-rays, teeth cleaning, gingivectomy, extractions and periodontal treatment.

Two weeks post treatment Tripper had responded well to treatment and his periodontal disease had improved. Dr. Boyd scheduled Tripper for a two month re-evaluation appointment and recommended complete cat home dental care protocol using CET toothpaste and Biotene.

Feline Dental DiseaseUnfortunately at the two month evaluation Tripper’s condition was worse and he was developing inflammation of the gingiva and mucosa in the back of his mouth. Home care was difficult and Tripper was uncomfortable and in pain. Dr. Boyd recommended full extractions of all of Tripper’s remaining teeth as the best treatment for his condition.

One month after Tripper’s teeth were extracted the follow-up evaluation revealed healing tissues and 50 percent improvement in the red –inflamed oral tissue. Tripper was eating well and did not show signs of pain. After treatment, Dr. Boyd received the following note from Tripper’s family:

“We have just recently had our 3 1/2 year male adorable cat’s teeth all removed because of early health problems before we had him.  Dr. Boyd and his team were absolutely the best.  Of course, Tripper, our cat is still not sure what he thinks of them but he is warming up to them.  He is healthier and so much more energetic since they helped him get on the right track and now we will keep him healthy.  He is eating soft and  hard food and hard treats – he is amazing.  He was eating 2-3 days after all his teeth were extracted.  If you have a pet with dental health problems – look no farther – this is the place – they are knowledgeable, empathetic and truly seem to love their vocation.  We consider them part of our family now.  Thanks to all of you!!”

Hoping to Save Dog’s Incisor Teeth After Anesthesia Free Dental Care

Dog with periodontal diseaseBrioso had been getting anesthesia free dentistry performed for the last few years. Upon a regular veterinary visit, the doctor examined his mouth and teeth, which looked good externally. However, the vet then performed an Orastrip test to help identify periodontal disease.

OraStrip canine periodontal disease test strip

The test results were positive for periodontal disease and the patient was placed under anesthesia for an exam and dental radiographs (x-rays). Unfortunately, numerous severely diseased teeth were found, including the dog’s lower incisors which were very loose.

Brioso was referred to Dr. Niemiec of Southern California Veterinary Specialties to try and save his incisors, as extraction of a dog’s incisors not optimal and when possible, veterinary dentists will make every effort to preserve these teeth.

In order to save the teeth, a periodontal flap was performed to clean the infected root surfaces, followed by bone grafting and a barrier to attempt to regrow the lost bone. In addition, because of the loose teeth, a periodontal splint was placed to help the area heal.

Cases like this are becoming more common as more pet owners are choosing to skip proper veterinary dental care, for anesthesia free dental cleanings. Like other cases, Brioso’s demonstrates the ineffectiveness of anesthesia free pet teeth cleanings and the potential damage and more extensive treatment costs in the long term. While it is good news we have the technology to save pet teeth when possible, veterinary dental professionals would prefer a pet receive proper pet dental cleanings which can prevent pet dental disease from becoming so severe.

Below are images of Brioso’s case, however it will take up to six months to determine if the bone grafting worked and his teeth saved.

 

 

Thomas - Cat Root Canals - AZ Vet Dentists

Thomas the Cat Finds a Home and Dentist

Thomas - Cat Root Canals - AZ Vet DentistsThomas was a stray cat who found a wonderful owner who gave him a home and even found him a cat dentist. It’s not only a great story about a kind person who gave a cat a home, but an example of the difference having a pain free mouth makes for animals.

“Thomas has quite a story. He is a yellow shorthair, probably about 6 years old. He wandered the Bashas’ parking lot at Scottsdale Road and Grayhawk for over five years. He made a lot of friends, mainly begging food from Bashas’ shoppers. He slept in the bushes and managed to hide from coyotes, bobcats, owls and hawks. He had several kind-hearted women who fed him every night, rain and shine for over five years. However, the property managers were very unhappy that people were feeding stray cats on the property, and two of the businesses posted signs telling people not to feed the cats.

So, I figured it was time to catch Thomas and give him a forever home. I took a cage out for a week and got him used to coming and going into it. Then, one night he went in after tuna fish, and I closed the door. He wasn’t happy, but didn’t bite or scratch.

Cat After Root CanalI took him to my vet who found out he had some broken teeth and recommended Dr. Visser at Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists. I took him in and Dr. Visser recommended root canal therapy to fix the teeth as opposed to removing them.  I don’t know how someone can do a root canal on a tooth as small as a cat’s, but thanks to Dr. Visser, Thomas still has three of his four canines. He also had two infected teeth, which required extraction and the rest of his teeth got a good cleaning.

At the time of his root canal recheck he’s gained weight and is doing really well. The first week he slept most of the time but now, he is interested in cuddling and drooling all over my arms. He is adjusting well to being inside, with no yowling or crying and he sleeps through the night. Thomas is a beautiful cat with a great personality. And now he will have a pain free, beautiful smile! He is one lucky cat!”

Below are images of Thomas’s teeth prior to treatment and a veterinary dental radiograph showing the root canal.