Cat Dentistry

Maintaining a cat’s dental health is extremely important and cats are susceptible to all of the same dental problems as dogs. There are other feline specific dental diseases that cat owners should be aware of including feline stomatitis and feline tooth resporption. In addition to home dental care, it is important for cats to have regular veterinary dental cleanings and exams to assure that their teeth and mouth remain healthy and without disease. Board certified vet dentists can provide the highest level of dental care for cats.


Cats Have Teeth Too!

Today we present two cases of cats, Lexi and Fellix, who were treated for broken canines at Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery. Fractured teeth are typically a dog issue, but cats do break teeth as well.  In general, the canines are the most common tooth that is broken in cats.  One major difference for cats is that their root canal extends very close to the tip of the tooth.  This means that almost any fracture will cause direct root canal (nerve) exposure.

Continue reading “Cats Have Teeth Too!” »

Minnie the Cat

Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair

Minnie came to us after having had surgical care for injuries she previously sustained in a coyote attack.  She was originally treated at an outside surgical practice where the mandible (lower jaw) was fixed with a bone plate. Unfortunately, the occlusion (alignment) was off and which was causing pain and she would not eat. Another practitioner then extracted most of her teeth to alleviate the trauma and hopefully result in cessation of the clinical signs.  Sadly, both of these significantly invasive surgeries did not resolve the issue and she was still not eating. Continue reading “Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair” »

Older Pet

Is My Pet Too Old for Anesthesia?

Owners of aging dogs and cats are often hesitant about allowing their pet to be put under anesthesia for a dental cleaning or other procedure. There is a fear that the pet is too old and not able to handle the anesthesia, but this is really not the case at all. As with humans, old age isn’t a disease and when using the proper anesthetic dosages and protocols, anesthesia is quite safe for an older pet — just as it’s safe for an older person. Continue reading “Is My Pet Too Old for Anesthesia?” »

Ask the Vet Dentist: What Questions Should I Ask My Veterinarian About Pet Dental Health?

As veterinary dental specialists, we want to help pet owners know how they can best partner with their family veterinarian to monitor and improve their pet’s dental health. We understand the main point of contact for most pet owners as it relates to pet health is their veterinarian, so we want to share a few tips on questions that are important to ask about your dog or cat’s dental health and the pet dental cleanings. Continue reading “Ask the Vet Dentist: What Questions Should I Ask My Veterinarian About Pet Dental Health?” »

Orthodontic Problems in Pets are Often Quite Painful

Orthodontic problems are often quite painful, even though pets rarely any outward signs of an issue. However, it is very common for pet patients to be suffering from the trauma crated by the teeth hitting into the sensitive gums or palate. This traumatic damage can become quite significant, creating local infection. In addition, they can kill the teeth in the area due to the chronic percussion. Finally, in some cases the teeth can penetrate into the nasal cavity possibly leading to a severe nasal infection.  Continue reading “Orthodontic Problems in Pets are Often Quite Painful” »

Close up lesions

The case of hidden tooth resorption…

A professional veterinary dental cleaning is far more than a simple “scale and polish”.  While this is a key purpose for the procedure, there is another aspect which is as important (and actually in some cases MORE important) than the cleaning itself.  That is the oral examination and dental radiographs under anesthesia, almost always the only way painful problems can be identified in pets mouths. Continue reading “The case of hidden tooth resorption…” »

New Smiles for Shelter Pets!

Thanks to a group of veterinarians led by board-certified veterinary dental specialist Dr. Brook A. Niemiec, DVM, DAVDC of Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery, dogs and cats from Best Friends Animal Society sanctuary in Utah received important dental care that not only relieves painful dental conditions, but also greatly improves an animals chance of being adopted. Continue reading “New Smiles for Shelter Pets!” »

The periodontal probe in the pocket which confirms the periodontal pocket

Periodontal Abscess in a Cat

While advanced periodontal disease is thought of as being a small breed dog condition, cats do develop periodontal disease and can have significant secondary infections from it. In addition, oral abscesses are generally due to endodontic (root canal) infection, but they can also result from deep periodontal infections. Continue reading “Periodontal Abscess in a Cat” »

Annual Veterinary Pet Dental Care

Australian Veterinary Community Takes a Stance Against Anesthesia Free Dentistry

Our board certified veterinary dentists are thrilled to hear that our veterinary colleagues in Australia have taken the right stance on the practice of anesthesia free dentistry, and it’s clear risks to a pet’s welfare. Continue reading “Australian Veterinary Community Takes a Stance Against Anesthesia Free Dentistry” »