For Veterinary Professionals

As Board Certified Veterinary Dentists, we work closely with referring veterinarians. We value our relationship with our veterinary partners and seek to provide the latest news, information and educational opportunities related to the veterinary dentistry field, all aimed to help you best serve your clients.


Oral Damage from Dog’s Electric Burn

An adorable 18-month-old mix breed puppy who chewed on an electrical cord and the electric burn resulted in dead and infected teeth and damaged gingiva and bone. He had significant electrocution burns in his mouth due to the shock.  At the time, he needed to be treated at an emergency facility due to the fact that he developed pulmonary edema (which is a common complication of electrical accidents). Continue reading “Oral Damage from Dog’s Electric Burn” »

Minnie the Cat

Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair

Minnie came to us after having had surgical care for injuries she previously sustained in a coyote attack.  She was originally treated at an outside surgical practice where the mandible (lower jaw) was fixed with a bone plate. Unfortunately, the occlusion (alignment) was off and which was causing pain and she would not eat. Another practitioner then extracted most of her teeth to alleviate the trauma and hopefully result in cessation of the clinical signs.  Sadly, both of these significantly invasive surgeries did not resolve the issue and she was still not eating. Continue reading “Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair” »

Treating Advanced Periodontal Disease in Dog with Heart Conditions & High Anesthesia Risk

Lucy, a sweet older dog, has had advanced periodontal disease for a long time.  The clients were well aware of the severity and how it was negatively affecting her health.  However, she also has a pretty significant heart problem.  This was so severe that her family vet was not willing to take a chance on putting her under anesthesia to take care of her teeth.  Sadly, the infection progressed to the point where her pet parent could tell she wasn’t feeling well. Continue reading “Treating Advanced Periodontal Disease in Dog with Heart Conditions & High Anesthesia Risk” »

The endodontic systems have now been completely cleaned and filled. This result will allow for complete healing as well as pain and infection free teeth.

All Root Canals are Not Created (or Performed) Equally.

Broken teeth are a very common problem in dogs, and in fact it has been shown that fully 10 percent of dog have a tooth with direct pulp (or nerve) exposure. Therefore, many pets are in need of treatment for this painful malady.  The only options for therapy of a fractured tooth are root canal therapy and extraction.  Veterinary Dentists generally prefer saving teeth via root canal therapy, especially strategic teeth like canines.

Root canals preserve the function of the tooth as well as avoid a painful extraction procedure.  Canine teeth have huge roots (Figure 1) and the extraction requires a large incision as well as drilling away jaw bone.  In addition, extraction has numerous potential complications including incision line breakdown and in cases of lower teeth extraction, jaw fracture.

Figure 1: Image of an extracted canine and fourth premolar from a large breed dog demonstrating the size.

Figure 1: Image of an extracted canine and fourth premolar from a large breed dog demonstrating the size.

These facts make saving these important teeth via root canal procedures the best option.  However, it is important to note that root canals must be properly performed for them to be successful.  Unfortunately, they are a not an easy procedure, and many clinics offering this service have not been properly trained.  Finally, since pets rarely show signs of oral pain, poorly performed and/or painful root canals, will not generally be appreciated by the owner.

In this case, root canals were performed on a police dog, which were rechecked at veterinary dental specialties and oral surgery.  There were no outward clinical signs of failure, however the dental radiographs revealed that the procedure was done very poorly. (Figures 2 and 3).

Recheck intraoral dental images of the left (2) and right (3) maxillary canine. In figure 2, it is obvious that the gutta percha point is way to small to fill the canal. In figure 3, the canal is only filled in the coronal half, leaving the most important apical ½ completely unfilled. In both cases (but especially the right side) there was periapical rarefaction associated with the tooth (red arrows).

Recheck intraoral dental images of the left (2) and right (3) maxillary canine. In figure 2, it is obvious that the gutta percha point is way to small to fill the canal.

In figure 3, the canal is only filled in the coronal half, leaving the most important apical ½ completely unfilled. In both cases (but especially the right side) there was periapical rarefaction associated with the tooth (red arrows).

In figure 3, the canal is only filled in the coronal half, leaving the most important apical ½ completely unfilled. In both cases (but especially the right side) there was periapical rarefaction associated with the tooth (red arrows).

Southern California Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery had to redo the procedures, (Figures 4 and 5) which is more difficult and time consuming to perform.  Therefore, it is important to select only well-trained veterinary dentists for this procedure.

Post-op dental radiographs of the teeth after they had been properly endodontically treated.

Post-op dental radiographs of the teeth after they had been properly endodontically treated.

The endodontic systems have now been completely cleaned and filled. This result will allow for complete healing as well as pain and infection free teeth.

The endodontic systems have now been completely cleaned and filled. This result will allow for complete healing as well as pain and infection free teeth.

If your pet has a broken tooth, it is important to ensure that they are being treated by the very best board certified veterinary dentists. Find a board certified veterinary dentist.

Fractured Jaw Repair in Small Dog

This is Sugar who suffered a broken jaw due to advanced periodontal disease. She had been seen at her family vet after being involved in a dog fight.  He had sedated Sugar to fully evaluate the fracture and had extracted the very loose molar in the area. Once he realized the jaw was fractured, he referred her to Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery for care.

Continue reading “Fractured Jaw Repair in Small Dog” »

Pathologic Mandibular Fracture in an Older, Small Breed Dog

Classically, mandibular fractures were the result of significant trauma (hit by car, long falls, baseball bat accident), and in large breed dogs this is definitely still the case.  However, in our small and toy breeds, there is a condition seen with increasing regularity which is called a “pathologic fracture”.  Continue reading “Pathologic Mandibular Fracture in an Older, Small Breed Dog” »

Marvin

Puppy With Swelling Over Teeth

Little Marvin  is a 9-month-old Labrador Retriever who was seen by Dr. Brook Niemiec at his Las Vegas veterinary dentistry practice. The puppy had swelling over his maxillary incisors from the time he was about five months old. The firm swelling and missing tooth in the area made the most likely diagnosis a benign tumor called an odontoma, or possibly a cyst. He was referred to Dr. Niemiec by his family veterinarian, who identified the need for the puppy to be assessed by a skilled oral surgeon and allow Marvin to have minimal trauma and the best chance of success. Continue reading “Puppy With Swelling Over Teeth” »

External dental photograph showing the small entrance wound (white arrow).

Treatment for Rowdy After Accidental Gunshot Wound to the Jaw

Rowdy is a 2 year old boxer who enjoys life roaming on a few acres outside town. One night, he sustained an accidental close range gunshot wound to the jaw; the shell entered through the cheek of the lower left jaw, passed through the mandible and along the tongue and exited the mouth and lodged under the skin of the right front shoulder. Continue reading “Treatment for Rowdy After Accidental Gunshot Wound to the Jaw” »