Dr. Niemiec’s Pet Dental Cases


Free Online Veterinary Dentistry CE

Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral surgery and San Diego Vet Dental Training Center are hosting FREE online CE

April 16, Dr. Brook Niemiec presented the first of a series of live webinars for the veterinary profession, Emergency Veterinary Dentistry. This endeavor is designed to fill the gap of critical CE in the time of COVID when all in person meetings are cancelled.

This lecture was chosen because of the fact that due to COVID-19, more clients are delaying therapy and many clinics are limited/closed. This means that more dental therapy will be focused on true “dental emergencies”.  In addition, ER vets may need to manage cases they normally don’t.

He discussed how to manage emergency situations such as jaw fractures, tooth luxations, stomatitis, caustic burns (more common now cleaning supplies being used more often or inappropriately), and other urgent oral and dental issues.

We had more than 350 attendees worldwide for the first meeting, and we are hoping to build for the future.  These lectures are also being archived for those who could not join the live meeting.  RACE approved CE credit is still available, all you need to do is answer some questions from the lecture.

What is a Canine Malocclusion?

Malocclusions (bite alignment problems) are quite common in veterinary patients. They can be purely cosmetic, or can cause issues. Bubbas is a young dog who was referred to Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery by a family veterinarian who identified a a significant issue with his lower left canine. The canine had erupted into the middle of his mouth, because of the incorrect eruption path, it was infraerupted and the deciduous (puppy) canine was retained. Continue reading “What is a Canine Malocclusion?” »

Importance of Treating Fractured Feline Teeth

Fractured teeth are typically a dog issue, but cats do break teeth as well.  In general, the canines are the most common tooth that is broken in cats. One major difference for cats is that their root canal extends very close to the tip of the tooth.  This means that almost any fracture will cause direct root canal (nerve) exposure. Continue reading “Importance of Treating Fractured Feline Teeth” »

Patients with Heart Disease CAN Have Anesthesia

Meet Bambi, a beautiful little terrier cross with severe periodontal disease. However, she also has significant heart problems, so her family veterinarian and owners did not want to put her under anesthesia.  Sadly, this allowed her teeth to get more and more infected.  Finally, she developed a nasal infection secondary to her severe periodontal disease, and the cardiologist referred her to Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery. Continue reading “Patients with Heart Disease CAN Have Anesthesia” »

Senior Dog Undergoes Successful Oral Surgery & is Now Pain Free

Allie is an 18 year old Labrador Cross from Las Vegas pictured here with Dr. Niemiec’s Danish Resident Camilla.  She had two major surgeries on her right mandible (lower jaw) for a malignant cancer several years ago.  These were successful in curing the cancer; however the treatment changed the way her jaw functioned on that side leading to an increase in periodontal disease.  Continue reading “Senior Dog Undergoes Successful Oral Surgery & is Now Pain Free” »

Sophie, like a kitten again!

After being seen for advanced periodontal (gum) disease and tooth resorption at Veterinary Dental Specialties and Dental Surgery,  Sophie returned for her 2-week recheck.  As is very common for us to hear, her owner reported that she was acting like a kitten again. She is an older (approximately 15 years) cat and has some minor health issues.  Because of her age and these concerns, the clients were not recommended to pursue dental care.  Thus, Sophie had developed significant dental disease prior to presentation.  Continue reading “Sophie, like a kitten again!” »

Untreated Malocclusions Create Painful Damage for 9 Year Old Bassett Hound

Dopey, a 9 year old male Bassett Hound had undergone regular dental cleanings but his owner was told there were not any significant concerns, despite the fact that he had a class II (Overshot) bite.  One of his veterinarians early in his life noted the malocclusions and lesions on the palate but said it “probably wouldn’t cause any future issues”.  After a cleaning and assessment at the start of last month, it was suggested he might have an oral nasal fistula and he was referred to Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery.

Continue reading “Untreated Malocclusions Create Painful Damage for 9 Year Old Bassett Hound” »

Cats Have Teeth Too!

Today we present two cases of cats, Lexi and Fellix, who were treated for broken canines at Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery. Fractured teeth are typically a dog issue, but cats do break teeth as well.  In general, the canines are the most common tooth that is broken in cats.  One major difference for cats is that their root canal extends very close to the tip of the tooth.  This means that almost any fracture will cause direct root canal (nerve) exposure.

Continue reading “Cats Have Teeth Too!” »

Oral Damage from Dog’s Electric Burn

An adorable 18-month-old mix breed puppy who chewed on an electrical cord and the electric burn resulted in dead and infected teeth and damaged gingiva and bone. He had significant electrocution burns in his mouth due to the shock.  At the time, he needed to be treated at an emergency facility due to the fact that he developed pulmonary edema (which is a common complication of electrical accidents). Continue reading “Oral Damage from Dog’s Electric Burn” »

Minnie the Cat

Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair

Minnie came to us after having had surgical care for injuries she previously sustained in a coyote attack.  She was originally treated at an outside surgical practice where the mandible (lower jaw) was fixed with a bone plate. Unfortunately, the occlusion (alignment) was off and which was causing pain and she would not eat. Another practitioner then extracted most of her teeth to alleviate the trauma and hopefully result in cessation of the clinical signs.  Sadly, both of these significantly invasive surgeries did not resolve the issue and she was still not eating. Continue reading “Treating Previously Unsuccessful Cat Jaw Fracture Repair” »