Dr. Niemiec’s Pet Dental Cases


New Smiles for Shelter Pets!

Thanks to a group of veterinarians led by board-certified veterinary dental specialist Dr. Brook A. Niemiec, DVM, DAVDC of Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery, dogs and cats from Best Friends Animal Society sanctuary in Utah received important dental care that not only relieves painful dental conditions, but also greatly improves an animals chance of being adopted. Continue reading “New Smiles for Shelter Pets!” »

The periodontal probe in the pocket which confirms the periodontal pocket

Periodontal Abscess in a Cat

While advanced periodontal disease is thought of as being a small breed dog condition, cats do develop periodontal disease and can have significant secondary infections from it. In addition, oral abscesses are generally due to endodontic (root canal) infection, but they can also result from deep periodontal infections. Continue reading “Periodontal Abscess in a Cat” »

Kitty’s Retained Tooth Root

Kitty, an eight year old cat, was examined by the veterinarian at the Department of Animal Services, who noted gum disease. They contacted Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery for diagnosis and treatment so the kitty would have both a healthy mouth and improved opportunity for adoption. Continue reading “Kitty’s Retained Tooth Root” »

Charlie the Sea Otter Gets a Visit from the Dentist

Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery Team at Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific

Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery Team at Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific

Charlie is a sea otter at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific. Aquarium staff noticed his a decreased appetite and he was showing signs of oral pain. A sedated exam by the aquarium veterinarian revealed food entrapment between the mandibular fourth premolars and first molars, which was causing gum recession and inflammation. So, the aquarium made the call to Dr. Brook Niemiec and his team at Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery. Continue reading “Charlie the Sea Otter Gets a Visit from the Dentist” »

Puppy Cleft Palate Repair

Cali came to Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery for cleft palate repair.

Cali came to Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery for cleft palate repair.

Little Cali was born with a congenital cleft palate. She was constantly getting material and food caught in her nose, which not only creates difficulty breathing, but also creates an environment for chronic nasal infection.

Dr. Niemiec of Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery performed a cleft palate surgery to close the defect. Cali will be able to lead a normal life once she heals.

 

 

A Non-Anesthetic Dentistry (NAD) Nightmare

As you know, veterinary dentists are strongly against the practice of anesthesia free dentistry or Non-Anesthetic Dentistry (NAD). There are numerous reasons for this, but mostly because it is a completely ineffective method of pet dental care. Moreover, the single most important step of a prophylaxis (subgingival scaling) cannot be performed without general anesthesia. Patients are often seen following NAD with clean crowns (visible portion of the tooth), but with significant areas of subgingival calculus. This may be the most damaging issue with this service, as it gives the client a false sense that they are improving the dental health of their pet. Dr. Niemiec along with his colleagues regularly have to have hard discussions with clients who are very upset when dental disease is diagnosed despite “clean” crowns. These clients feel that they have “failed” their pet, allowing them to progress to disease despite their well-intentioned efforts.

The following case contains detailed case photographs and video demonstrating the severity of the circumstances and evidence as to the risks of anesthesia free dental cleanings.

This patient had received regular (every other month) NAD. Despite this, she had waxing and waning halitosis. She was eventually referred to Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery for a fractured tooth. Upon oral exam, the fractured left maxillary fourth premolar (208) was confirmed; however the teeth were fairly clean, with a few areas of calculus and gingival recession. (Figures 1-3) The patient was placed under anesthesia and oral exam revealed further areas of recession as well as a draining tract over the left maxillary canine (204). (Figure 4).

Periodontal probing revealed numerous periodontal pockets including a very deep pocket on the left canine (Figures 5-8) ad furcation 3 exposure on several teeth (Figure 9). In addition to the advanced periodontal disease, the patient also had tooth resorption, which is a very painful condition.

Finally, watch to see the right maxillary M1 (109) mobile level 3.

Dental radiographs confirmed severe periodontal loss and TRs (Figures 10-14) and surgically 204 had significant bone loss (Figure 15).

The patient was treated with numerus extractions. When the patient returned for the two week recheck, the owner commented that not only was their pet’s breath  greatly improved, but also had far more energy.

All veterinary dentists have cases similar to this in which pets have suffered needlessly due to lack of proper care. NAD only serves to hide periodontal disease as well as other painful and infectious conditions.

We encourage veterinarians to refer their clients to this article as well avdc.org/afd for more education about the risks of anesthesia free dental cleanings and to encourage regular veterinary dental cleanings under anesthesia as part of their pet’s regular care.

Veterinary Dental radiographs revealed severe bone loss

Treating Severely Infected Pet Teeth with Root Canal Therapy

Veterinary Dental radiographs revealed severe bone loss

Dental radiographs revealed severe bone loss.

Last year, a 10 year old Shih Tsu was referred to Veterinary Dental Specialties and Oral Surgery for a suspect mandibular fracture. This was based on the dental radiographs taken at the referring veterinarian. The patient was placed under general anesthesia and a complete oral exam and radiographs were performed. This revealed very slight laxity at the mandibular right first molar. However the jaw was overall stable. Continue reading “Treating Severely Infected Pet Teeth with Root Canal Therapy” »

Root Canals Enable Bobcat to Keep Vital Teeth

reggiemain_300Reggie was brought to Veterinary Dental Specialties & Oral Surgery in California for evaluation of a recurrent left facial swelling with abscess formation. Reggie is a bobcat who is cared for by Fund For Animals Wildlife Center, who had been keeping an eye on the condition had persisted for about two years. In the past, the swelling responded to antibiotic administration, however it after the condition continued to persist, it was clear that Reggie needed a more thorough veterinary specialist evaluation.

Bobcat Root Canal - Veterinary DentistryAfter being safely anesthetized, a thorough evaluation and veterinary dental x-rays, revealed that three of his canine teeth had exposed pulp secondary to dental attrition (wear). The pulp exposure allowed bacteria from the mouth to infect the endodontic system of Reggie’s teeth. Once the pulp is infected and it becomes necrotic there is no way for the animal’s immune system to combat this infection, which leads to the constant release of bacteria from the bottom of the tooth’s root. The constant release of bacteria leads to abscess formation causing Reggie’s recurrent facial swelling.

The priority for veterinary dentists is always to save an animal’s teeth when possible. In wildlife cases, even those at animal sanctuaries, the animal often relies on heavily on certain teeth, in Reggie’s case the canines. Each of the three infected teeth were treated with root canal therapy, which in typically will last through the rest of the animal’s life.

Reggie is now in far less pain and with a healthy mouth that will allow him to roam and enjoy life at the sanctuary.

Treating Labrador Retriever’s Oral Tumor

Note the obvious swelling of the right maxilla. The owner reported rapid growth of the mass, debulked 2 months prior.

Note the obvious swelling of the right
maxilla. The owner reported rapid growth of the mass, debulked two months prior.

“Mr. Gibbs” is a 12 year old Labrador Retriever who came to Gulf South Veterinary Dentistry & Oral Surgery to have a tumor removed from his mouth.

The large tumor had grown back quickly after his regular veterinarian biopsied it a couple of months earlier. We knew it was a tumor called a plasmacytoma, which is generally not metastatic (does not spread to other parts of the body), but can be locally invasive. The mass was irritating the dog and the owners so we removed it, along with several teeth and part of the upper jaw, or maxilla.

While we were unable to remove the deepest parts of the tumor that had grown into the bones of his nose, “Mr. Gibbs” is much happier and more comfortable than he was before the surgery. He is now seeing a veterinary oncologist (cancer specialist) for follow up treatment of a more serious mass on his skin that we removed at the same time as the jaw surgery.

tumor in dog's mouth

A photo of the tumor in “Mr. Gibbs” mouth.

The incision site at the two week recheck. Everything looks great!

The incision site at the two week recheck. Everything looks great!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is no sign that either cancer has spread and “Gibbs” continues to do great at home.

“Mr. Gibbs” and his owner were both very happy at the 2 week recheck. One can hardly tell he had a large piece of his upper jaw removed!

“Mr. Gibbs” and his owner were both very happy at the 2 week recheck. One can hardly tell he had a large piece of his upper jaw removed!

If at any point you notice a growth or tumor in your dog or cat’s mouth, or unusual swelling on their face, it’s extremely important to have it immediately evaluated by a veterinary dentist who can determine whether the tumor is benign or malignant and then provide the best possible treatment plan.