Vet Dental Update: Vol. 1 No. 6

Anesthesia and pain management for small animals
Beckman B
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 43(3):669-88, 2013.

Abstract
Anesthesia for oral surgery in dogs and cats requires special consideration and thorough planning to maximize patient safety. Well-trained technical staff capable of providing expedient delivery of quality dental radiographs and precision anesthesia monitoring are essential. Doctors need to be well versed in dental radiographic interpretation and competent and experienced in oral surgical techniques, particularly in surgical extractions. The work flow from patient induction to recovery involves estimate generation and client communication with multiple staff members. Knowledge of anesthetic and analgesic agents from premedication to postoperative pain management play an equally important role in patient safety.

Veterinary dentistry in senior canines and felines
Holmstrom SE.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 42(4):793-808, 2012.

Abstract
When you have completed this article, you will be able to (1) understand and grade patients with periodontal disease and prescribe proper treatment for them; (2) describe the AVDC Stages of Tooth resorption and the treatment; (3) describe the non-clinically aggressive and aggressive oral tumors; (4) be knowledgeable of the American Animal Hospital Association Guidelines on Veterinary Dental Procedures and how to obtain them; and (5) understand the disadvantage of Non-Professional Dental Scaling (NPDS) and why it should not be performed.

Assessment of dental abnormalities by full-mouth radiography in small breed dogs.
Kim CG, Lee SY, Kim JW, Park HM
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc.49(1):23-30, 2013

Abstract

This study was performed to evaluate full-mouth radiographic findings to determine the prevalence of dental abnormalities and analyze the relationship between dental abnormalities and age in small breed dogs. Sixteen predetermined categories of abnormal radiographic findings were evaluated in 233 small breed dogs. In total, 9,786 possible permanent teeth could be evaluated. Of those, 8,308 teeth were evaluated and abnormal radiographic findings were found in 2,458 teeth (29.6%). The most common teeth with abnormal radiographic findings were the mandibular first molars (74.5% on the left and 63.9% on the right) and the maxillary fourth premolars (40.5% on the left and 38.2% on the right). Bone loss of any type (15.8%) was the most commonly detected radiographic abnormal finding among the 16 categories. Dental conditions with a genetic predisposition were frequently occurred in the mandibular premolar teeth. Shih tzu frequently had unerupted teeth and dentigerous cysts. Among the teeth with abnormal radiographic findings, 4.5%, 19.8%, and 5.3% were considered incidental, additional, and important, respectively. Findings that were only detected on radiographs, which were not noted on routine oral examination, were more common in older dogs. Full-mouth radiographic evaluation should be performed to obtain important information for making accurate diagnoses.

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